Tintin au pull bleu @Hergé
Tintin (©Hergé) is no anti-conformist rather an early Hipster

What Europe perceives as hipsters, are if at all wrong hipsters. The hipster who adheres to the genuine category can’t easily be made out to belong to any modern standard group. The hipster has stripped off any attributes. Hipster dress like rare common people, who don’t get shown on tv or paid attention to by the media. Something we tried to explain earlier. Many Environmentally conscious lesbians in my neighborhood, riding their bikes wearing tight latex pants are no hipsters. Their bearded friends with highcut hairdos are no hipsters. They are yuppies who can afford to live in the inner city, but yuppies are no longer a topic they don’t exist, even though they deserve to make a comeback. Wrong hipsters. So what then is a hipster?

Complexity science explains why efforts to reject the mainstream merely result in new conformity. Jonathan Touboul at Brandeis University in Massachusetts explained the hipster effect1 only yesterday.

Here he explains the hipster effect: the counterintuitive phenomenon in which people who oppose mainstream culture all end up looking the same.

Here are two earlier occurrences expressing the hipster effect rather well. In 2011 by Mark Earls book title literally:

Authors Mark Earls and Alex Bentley explore how ideas, behavior and culture spread through the simple means of doing what others do.

The reason why anti-conformists always end up looking the same becomes obvious at lunch when the waiter takes your orders and you hear someone in your company say: “I’ll have what she’s having.”

Remember 1989’s movie “When Harry Met Sally”, when Meg Ryan delivered a very public and very fake orgasm and this older woman who says, “Waiter, I’ll have what she’s having.”((Billy Crystal reveals secret behind ‘I’ll have what she’s having’ scene)).

When you are at your next lunch and you hear: I’ll have what she’s having.”, the shows you how we use the brains of others to think for us and as storage space for knowledge about the world.

  1. The hipster effect: Why anti-conformists always end up looking the same / MIT Technology Review []