Africa’s deadliest

Within the deadliest circle
of commercial design

Ad for a NatGeo film.

Africa’s deadliest

Ad for a NatGeo film.

Face to face

Ad for a NatGeo film.

Circle of predator and prey

NatGeo Wild

One of NatGeo’s fabulous logo renderings

Advertising Agency: Rocket Yard, Tallinn, Estonia
Art Director: Oussama Founi
Illustrator: Sattu
Cgi: Oussama Founi
Account Manager: Ann Kelkej

vignette

While ad practitioners are discussing how digital advertising should be staged – wether to make use of motion now that technology allows the use of animation – National Geographic with its broad readership is conclusive and makes use of an inherent human condition for its film promotion in a strictly conservative fashion:

For beauty is in the eye of the beholder and symetry is viewed as beautiful.

Preditor and prey face to face (Source: The New Yorker Magazine).

Preditor and prey face to face (Source: The New Yorker Magazine).

A glorious moment in the eye of the beholder when designers allow for you to find peace in a troubled world and rest on something that does not fidget, but draws its attention with its narrative, and with all its used elements to refrain from any attempts to escape from this circle of sublime concentration. A mature achievement.

Read in full overat adeevee.com

 

 

Get even made easy

Getting even made easy and fast.

Getting even made easy and fast.

Nice icons too.

Nice icons too.

“I Woke Up to a Fucked-Up America.” Your Sunday song.

On the bombastic “I Woke Up in a Fucked-Up America,” the experimental musician Lonnie Holley sings like a man shaking off a nightmare.

On the bombastic “I Woke Up in a Fucked-Up America,” the experimental musician Lonnie Holley sings like a man shaking off a nightmare.

Here, he pieces together a patchwork of American cruelty: connecting his childhood in Birmingham, Alabama in the Jim Crow-Era Südlcih t, he laments the “breakdown of words,” Wall Street crimes, and digital “overdatafying.” But for all his despair, Holley speaks to ways forward, pleading for change and a recognition of dignity.”

I am glad to read that Woodbury won’t lean on the all too popular president bashing the liberal press has so successfully injected under our skins.

Read in full byJason P. Woodbury

 

 

Queuing in best English

Wimbledon Queuing in best English. Source: Quartz

Wimbledon Queuing in best English. Source: Quartz

Two years after their last meeting in the Wimbledon final, Serena Williams and Angelique Kerber will clash again on the same stage. (Getty Images)

Two years after their last meeting in the Wimbledon final, Serena Williams and Angelique Kerber will clash again on the same stage. (Getty Images)


Quartz, a superb online edition by The Atlantic Newpaper devotes its attention to the most famous queue. That of Wimbledon. An opportunity to weigh accompanying trends towards political incorrectness against civil correctness and courage:

The Waiting Game

In some contexts, a queue signifies serious scarcity; in others, it’s an unremarkable part of daily life, or even a particular kind of status symbol. In all, there are unique aspects to psychology and local culture embedded in this primal activity.

The Mind Game

The waiting game in the wake of the hunger games. Bread and circuses. Imagination takes flight at anything with a potential to dissolve into design (think behavior).

Queuing

Elementary school teached us of British brilliance in behavior. How the Brits line up for entering the double-decker bus in sharp contrast to annoying peeps pressing to skip the line at any given occasion. Be it at your laundry place, your bodega, burger joint, or in winter at your ski lift. Brits can do it, others are presented a steep learning curve.

Is civilian obedience in a position to put political incorrectness out of power? Queuing instead of streaming at a time of breaking news and an insurmountable need for immediacy?

What’s with cool calm collectiveness, the much applauded British sportiness? Alas, disruption.

In art school, I sat next to the son whose father illustrated this unforgettable ad for a now defunct cigarette brand:

Hold it my friend. Who’s going to blow ones top? Have a smoke, then everything goes without saying.