Low Self-Esteem via The New Yorker

The New Yorker

 

 

During puberty one may allow oneself irritation as a living reproach to self-esteem. So be it. With the event of puberty you are shoved into cold water, and exposed to a great experiment that is not of your choosing.

Was Holden Caulfield suffering from low self-esteem? No, he was tuned in self-conception and had a sharp mind of great clarity.

I prefer self-conception over self-esteem. It goes without saying, is self evident, comes natural and generates itself without a thought. You need not bother, its automatic. I favour laziness over business.

 

Vignette

 

Since 2006, when for the fifth time, I tossed a small fortune, this time with the buy of real estate into the Berlin river Spee. A million Euro credit and six years later, my self-esteem still must regenerate. My self-conception is not affected. In the contrary, I know what to think of myself and worse, what to think of others.

 

 

“Procures for cash, as much as you can, no matter how”

Thomas Meinecke, excerpt from the “Sprengreiter-Poem”.

 

 

The web allows us to work at a pace we find fitting, even when we are slow. It’s a slow internet. I don’t come from the web but from hypertext. A technology that enables the web’s world wide spread. Hypertext holds skittischness and loss of context to its effect. It fragmented before fragmentation took place in the physical world. It’s visualisation resembles animations we have come to know from popular science classes. A sparkling diffusion of neurotransmitters when impulses pass the synapses by way of association.

Motivation is not social its shaped of capitalistic origin and upbringing. A paradox. Yet the commercial use of the web protects us from accusations of acting selfish and in vain. The author with a blog is less dirty since she promotes sales for her book. With western coinage it is considered noble and its imitation is recommended.

All falls into place if everyone looks after themselves.

 

 

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