Olympiaeinkaufszentrum below of where the rampage shooting took place

Olympiaeinkaufszentrum: Below of where the rampage shooting took place – Photo: Robert Haas

 

 

Public Eye Candy

 

Süddeutsche Zeitungeye candy subway stations
The first implementation in 1971 went sour with mediocre standardised subway stations. Today most stations carry a local design, often a melt of art and architecture.

All stations are equipped with elevators for mothers with strollers or folks with wheelchairs.

 

 

Wettersteinplatz - Photo: Alessandra Schellnegger

Wettersteinplatz – Photo: Alessandra Schellnegger

 

 

Marienplatz smack in the center of Munich town was the first station to disrupt the standard design prior to the 90s. - Photo: Florian Peljak

Marienplatz: Smack in the center of Munich town was the first station to disrupt the standard design prior to the 90s. – Photo: Florian Peljak

 

 

Münchner Freiheit - Photo: Stephan Rumpf

Münchner Freiheit: Light design by Ingo Maurer – Photo: Stephan Rumpf

 

 

Candidplatz - Photo: Florian Peljak

Candidplatz: Flemish rainbow – Photo: Florian Peljak

 

 

Königsplatz - Photo: Florian Peljak

Königsplatz – Mini exhibition with 32 artefacts. – Photo: Florian Peljak

 

 

Oberwiesenfeld - Photo: Florian Peljak

Oberwiesenfeld: “Ornament” by sculpturer Rudolf Herz – Photo: Florian Peljak

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Moosacher St.-Martins-Platz - Photo: Stephan Rumpf

Moosacher St.-Martins-Platz: Daylight and 76 000 Polaroids behind glas walls – Photo: Stephan Rumpf


Eye candy subway stations

 

 

Westfriedhof - Photo: Robert Haas

Westfriedhof: Likely the most popular station features a cave like atmosphere, another light design by Ingo Maurer. The giant ∅ 3,80m lamps light up dark areas out of reach of the subtle flow of daylight – Photo: Robert Haas

 

 

Georg-Brauchle-Ring Photo: Stephan Rumpf

Georg-Brauchle-Ring: In midst of Franz Ackermann’s installation “The great voyage”. Photo: Stephan Rumpf

Eye candy subway stations