zeitgeist

A pointer to Fascism’s an Epidemic. What’s the cure?

June 18th, 2016 No comments

 


This is NOT a Drill!

Your everyday behavior contributes to the cure

Fascism’s an Epidemic
Now is the time to make your social media activities pay of:

  • Ignore anti democratic press reports. Refrain from sharing articles on uproar about anti democratic suspects.
  • Social media is here to exploit your last sanctuary: Your cognitive surplus.

  • Share instead write ups on politicians and family businesses triumphing among big businesses.
  • Reward media reports on big business serving social goodness.
  • Enjoy and share your discoveries of businesses and activities serving social goodness.
  • Don’t be mad at Bernie Sanders.
  • Determine how your business supports democratic values and brag about it.
  • Make good use of your cognitive surplus with smart, fun sharing.
  • Know your name and keep your head up.
  • Make use of strategic consume. Support your trusted local neighbourhood shops.
  • Show your support for open source technology and other large scale movements that make tools available to mid- and small size businesses. There plenty out there!

 


Fascism’s an Epidemic

 

 

Cowboys and farmers

May 31st, 2016 Comments off

 

 

Cowboys and Farmers via ©Seth Godin

 

 

Because Donald Trump wants to build a fence, does that make him a farmer and no cowboy?

Kennt man einen, kennt man alle
The question pushes itself on with the 3 minutes reading of an entry by Seth Godin from May 20 on Medium.

And if Donald Trump is therefore a farmer, does the age old fight between farmers and cowboys flare up again, as a recent news report from a Trump rally in San Diego indicates?

Differentiating from the blog entries his readers are familiar with, and are in keeping with jewish text only tradition, Godin’t Medium articles feature images, such as the key visual you see here.
Read in fullby Seth Godin

 

 

Farmers


The farmer knows that the land is the land, and that it has to last for generations.
 
 
 
 
 


The farmer, land-bound, is eager to seek alliances, because an enemy of any sort can be a real problem.
 
 
 
 
 


Farmers came over on the Mayflower, and also represent a key national persona. Jimmy Carter was (literally) a farmer, as was George H. W. Bush, and so are Madeline Albright and Bill Gates. Lucille Ball was a farmer, so is Oprah.
Cowboys


The cowboy seeks out the emergency where he can be helpful, and brings a range of impresario skills to the table. He relishes the wide open spaces, and is always ready to move on to a new frontier. He has a bedroll and a horse and a small team.


The cowboy would rather tell a story than share statistics. The cowboy doesn’t mind having a nemesis, because, after all, he has a six-gun in his holster and leaving town isn’t really a tragedy.
 
 


Cowboys are an American icon, even if James Bond is a cowboy. So is McGyver, and so were Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush. Steve Jobs was a cowboy. (Steve Ballmer wanted to be one, but he didn’t succeed). Jimi Hendrix was a cowboy, along with CJ Walker.

 

 

 

 


Kennt man einen, kennt man alle

 

 

State of the Digital Nation 2016

May 28th, 2016 Comments off

 

 

Digital Nation

 

 

State of the Digital Nation 2016
A much recommended weekend lecture demands your full attention.

Bordering on a dissertation, Jules Erhardt’s report expands over 4 chapters. Prepare for unsettling insights covering 1︎⃣ Industry Perspective, 2︎⃣ Agency Perspective, 3︎⃣ New Perspective and 4︎⃣ Future Perspective.

Be warned though, none of this will necessarily be affirmative or have much of a calming effect on your weekend.
State of the Digital Nationby Jules Ehrhardt

 

 

State of the Digital Nation 2016

 

 

 


State of the Digital Nation 2016

 

 

Trending colors of the decade

May 24th, 2016 Comments off

 

 

How this year’s
‘it’ colors came to be.

Forecasters analyze and choose “important” colors for the year and determine color palettes. These are the ‘important’ colors of the decade:

 

 

Color palette: The important colors of the decade.

The ‘important’ colors of the decade

 

 

Trending colors of the decade
You may think buying that particular color shirt or houseware item was your decision, but color analysts and forecasters actually anticipated the color you may choose a few years in advance. Here’s a nifty interactive application by the Washington Post for your short attention span:Lifestyle learning experienceby the Washington Post
Washington Post

 

 

 

 


Trending colors of the decade

 

 

World class claim made by Munich brand

May 19th, 2015 Comments off

 

 

Product:

Agency:


 

 

„Weil es drauf ankommt wie es ankommt”

Can’t be easily translated in all its beauty and directness. What it means? “All depends on how something is being perceived”

A quintessential conclusion of what digital has educated us in or reminded us of. European tv commercials lend their content from the change of mind this early 21. Century, most immediately in the wake of digital directives.

Digital has introduced the advantage of having learned to love and hate usability with more than a decade of lead.

made in munich„Weil es drauf ankommt wie es ankommt” is discourse pop and a universal, dominant truth well told™, by which we are all exposed to the judgement of others while letting numbers do the numbers for accountability.

Storytelling is left to brands and their agencies, to the extent they succeed to have as many people as possible share their story.

It’s not best practice but the only practice. Same difference when arrival is everything?

 

 

History of the tallest building in North America

March 13th, 2015 Comments off

Tiffany Rose to the Occasion

January 28th, 2015 Comments off

 

 

Tiffany Rose to the Occasion

 

 

Tiffany is a cultural behemoth that stands for something in the American and global imagination. If it likens the affirmation of love with the wedding industry and encourages the purchase of luxury jewelry, it does so without discrimination for heterosexual and homosexual couples.

If some feel bitter that capitalism got there before the public sphere and the law, wipe your tears and lighten up. By sending encouraging signals, Tiffany makes same-sex imagery of engagement, wedding and family penetrate our culture and our conversations. That’s what Supreme Court was hoping for from the start.

Read in full by Ana Andjelic

 

 

Year in review

December 27th, 2014 Comments off

Regarding climate movement needs rebranding but these Milton Glaser buttons won’t do it

August 13th, 2014 Comments off

 

 

Es wird nicht wärmer, es stirbtWarming T-ShirtMilton Glaser mit 85.

 

 

Adele Peters discovers old school in Milton Glaser’s button campaign. Much like in the old days the message divides into two groups: Those who wear the button and those who won’t.

 

So appropriate, the idiot is wearing the dying earth symbol!

What a douchebag, he’s without symbol!

 

Glaser made a smart decision with keeping it simple. No complex, integrated campaign, for which resources and organisation is not available. But decide in favour of a recognisable sign that is affordable, immediately accessible. That is likeable and wearable. Even better yet, Milton decided for an analogue medium to be the message. A button in his name to get the ball rolling again. You order it, pin it on, done.

It’s a souvenir, done analogue. It’s the little things that count. Swinging Sixties.

Same as with Christmas cards. Sent analogue, the recipient puts it up with the other seasons greetings on his fireplace mantel shelf.

 

Daumen hoch, Sie mögen es.

 

In my lifetime, I was having students hit the streets and demonstrate causes in my interest, while I rarely left the house to work on my stuff. A button, like Milton Glaser’s, I wear in acceptance and respect for the 85 year old fellow designer. Also I can still hear the 60’s Publix jingle ring. “It’s the little things that count.”

Read in full by Adele Peters.

 

 

Embrace the misery

July 31st, 2014 Comments off

 

 

Embrace the Misery

 

 

You are by nature an optimist

A happy idiot. No personal disaster or run of bad luck has ever shaken your faith that the march of time brings progress. You believe the wicked eventually get their due. You’re confident that truth will come to light. You’ve never doubted that a hundred years hence, the world will be a better place.

Until lately.

Lately you’ve found yourself wondering if the end of civilization might be at hand, and you are not alone in your apprehension. Pessimism drifts in the air like a virulent pathogen, infecting multitudes. The media deliver daily reports of contemptible politicians and enraged mobs, religious fanatics and failed states, widespread unemployment and ecological catastrophe. A friend has been goading you to buy a gun and plenty of ammunition “before it’s too late.” (He owns more than thirty weapons himself: shotguns, hunting rifles, semi-automatic assault rifles, and an astonishing variety of pistols.) However you parse it, the future looks increasingly grim and Malthusian.

What happened? How did this collective despair displace the easy confidence of recent memory?

The technological miracles of our enlightened age were supposed to banish ignorance and alleviate human suffering. It was only a few decades ago that the Berlin Wall came down, prompting Francis Fukuyama to announce the triumph of Western ideals over the forces of tyranny, and proclaim that war had become obsolete.

Read in full by Jon Krakauer.

 

 

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