9/11 2015

The New Yorker Sept. 24 2001 next to paintings by Michael Dumontier und Neil Farber

 

 

At my appointment yesterday, an official explained to me, that structures were gone. Structures developed to hold the workforce together. The boundaries that used to define wrong from right. With one person to look up to in any given hierarchy it was as easy as can be to navigate and move along with ones life.

What has worked for families or smaller units also worked for the larger society. Their government and businesses. Boundaries kept in place by laws. For the sake of the larger popularity that stayed within those boundaries. Life was a game with a defined theme¹, easy to play.

It went well until emerging technologies enabled insights. Insights into the fabric of such operations system. Public Confidence withdrawal was the result.

14 years after the collapse of the World Trade Center. The Iraq wars as a consequence led to today’s exodus of refugees in Europe. Life has become a game without a given theme. No more structures to depend on, yet hard to manage, fragmented markets.

An adaptive OS is replacing the former. More often without payment system at this early stage than with. More work places get destroyed than created by the new economy. Dependable on scalability and automation while growth is no longer an option. Orientation with long-term leadership and one person to look up to is on its way out. The world transforms from solid to fluid.

Few rare birds supersede their parent’s wellbeing with a new business model. But at large this is the first, second and soon third generation doing worse than their parents.

Old habits die hard. Especially in Europe. And Europe has ignored the call for transformation in these 14 years. Europeans will have to do away with self-imposed immaturity.

Immaturity is the inability to use ones minds without direction from the outside². Pressure to come from within and only from there.

More on this over the upcoming weekend.

¹Thomas Meinecke ²Immanuel Kant

 

 

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